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  1. #1
    Intercooled 2.2 Forcefed's Avatar
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    Question Crank Case Evacuation

    Hey I'm finally getting back around to my neglected TD. I wanted to ask if any of you guys are doing anything for crank case evacuation? The reason I'm asking is because the last 2 builds on my engine I have had issues with blow by and blowing oil out of my valve cover breather. I was definitely pressurizing my crankcase.... I ran across the custom electric vacuum pump set up and I'm considering building something very similar to it. I wanted to get feed back from my fellow TD'ers. I've attached pictures below of the setup I was talking about and things a few statements that were in his post too.

    Stated Benefits with a electric vacuum pump:

    ELECTRIC CRANKCASE EVACUATION SYSTEM
    Apply a vacuum source to the crankcase. Rather than putting a breather on the valve cover to let crankcase pressure out, pull the air out with a pump to create a vacuum.
    Benefits of Negative Crankcase Pressure using an Electric Pump:

    1) Prevents oil leaks from seals and gaskets by eliminating crankcase pressure.
    2) Reduces parasitic losses from pistons pumping against crankcase air.
    3) Improves piston ring seal.
    4) Increases HP and makes your engine last longer.
    5) Eliminates your PCV system and the possibility of oil being sucked into your engine keeping your intake system and combustion chambers clean.
    6) Eliminates the need for mechanical belt driven evacuation pump that robs some HP and needs rebuilding frequently.
    7) Superior to valve cover breathers and exhaust path suction type pcv systems which contaminate your exhaust system and mufflers with oil.
    8) Pump can be set up with the filtered crankcase exhaust routed to air filter housing instead of out to breather if desired for a closed loop system (emission friendly).
    9) Fits in factory battery tray for easy access to engine. (Battery must be relocated to trunk or rear compartment).
    10) Ideal for Turbo, Supercharged and high compression engines which create higher crankcase pressures at high RPM’s/Loads.
    11) Creates 5 inches of vacuum in your crankcase with a very high CFM air flow when needed at high RPM’s, exhausting and filtering all blowby, while still maintaining its vacuum for ring seal.
    12) The waste oil level is easily seen through sight hose and drained through a valve on the side of catch can. If any oil vapors pass the modified Catch can, they will be condensed and caught in the Air Dryer before reaching the pump to ensure long pump life.






  2. #2
    Liquid Cooler Pandemoniac's Avatar
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    Interesting, if not a little elaborate & pricy, solution. Definitely a benefit if you're trying to get every last hp and maybe preserve some reliability as well.

    As for a lot of the crankcase pressurization, one of the major culprits is the fact that most replacement PCV valves that are supposedly for our engines don't close off properly under boost. After trying several that all didn't work right, I found a check valve used for some vacuum line applications & stuck it in between my intake & PCV valve. All the oil puking & dipstick popping adventures went away. I also did away with the pre-turbo crankcase vent line and used a vented oil cap. A very small amount of oil mist would accumulate around the vent over time, but nothing strikingly bad. I drove the car daily. Some people like to keep the line pre-turbo to pull from the crankcase for additional evacuation. The only reason I didn't like that is the heavy film of oil that accumulated on my old intercooler & charge pipes. Oil can be a good heat insulator and over time reduces the thermal efficiency of the IC. I decided I'd rather lose a tablespoon of oil every 1000 miles or so and keep my intercooler clean.
    If I had more time & money, the best solution would be a good oil catch can between the crankcase & turbo inlet. That would keep MOST of the oil vapors from reaching the intake.
    Travis Stewart
    '89 Shadow ES RIP 2004-2010

    '90 RX7 with Chevy LS motivation & ford 8.8" traction: under construction

  3. #3
    The Junkyard Master Force Fed Mopar's Avatar
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    FAQ: PCV!!! Read before you install an air intake.


    That is an interesting set-up though.


    Rob M.

  4. #4
    Turbo 3.0 owns you Ondonti's Avatar
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    I run dual exhaust crankcase dumps with 1 way checks. I was running one off each valvecover but they sucked so hard that oil would not drain out of my heads and it filled my block valley with oil as my heads overfilled with oil. Now I have one forked to both covers and one on the oil pan. Problem with the oil pan one is that it sucks oil so I had to build a baffle and also modify the breather (cut in half, add 6" of exhaust pipe, fill with copper wool).

    Considering how well it works I see no reason for electric setups. I used to be interested in them.
    Brent - Great Depression Racing
    1992 Duster -Was- 11.5@15 22psi BONE Stock 3.0 - 516whp 519ft/lb 20psi 6g72 3.13L "built" 6g72, PT6765, Tial 38mm open dump, 3" downpipe, 20x12x3" intercooler, GDP ported heads (+40% on flowbench), Ferrea Competition Plus +2 +1's, Nielson Vintage 300 deg turbo cams, RPW cam gears, Custom Ram short runner intake manifold, 47# injectors, 12 Gal Jaz Cell, Dual Walbro GSL392 255HPs, Dual 5/16" feed, Trick Flow AFPR, 3 puck solid & 3300# DD plate, OBX, Zeitronix WB/EGT/Boost, 108gph DevilsOwn 3 nozzle 34gph.
    -Now- stock 10:1 motor, 4.0 BAR MS2E II, N/A
    1994 Spirit - 13.85@108.8 10psi - 3.0L Holset He341 280whp 304ft/lb
    1981 & 1983 Starlet KP61

  5. #5
    Chief Procrastinator glhs0426's Avatar
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    I too used to have excessive "blow by" with my 2.2. I always thought it was odd that the car would use no oil, but the thing had so much blowby (or so I thought). The dipstick would pop out after a good hard run through the gears. I installed a Toyota Supra turbo pcv valve. No more dipstick popping out, no more oil stains around the dipstick, etc. The rest of the crankcase system is stock including the T on the back of the valve cover. P/N 12204-46020 from Toyota. P/N PV1009 from Purolator. BEWARE of aftermarket pcv valves! Check to make sure there is a seal inside for the valve to seat against. Some have it, some don't.

    There is no replacement for air displacement

    John R.

  6. #6
    Need members 4 wolf pack DodgeZ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by glhs0426 View Post
    I too used to have excessive "blow by" with my 2.2. I always thought it was odd that the car would use no oil, but the thing had so much blowby (or so I thought). The dipstick would pop out after a good hard run through the gears. I installed a Toyota Supra turbo pcv valve. No more dipstick popping out, no more oil stains around the dipstick, etc. The rest of the crankcase system is stock including the T on the back of the valve cover. P/N 12204-46020 from Toyota. P/N PV1009 from Purolator. BEWARE of aftermarket pcv valves! Check to make sure there is a seal inside for the valve to seat against. Some have it, some don't.

    I just bought two, neither had the seal.
    I'd rather be hated for who I am, rather than loved for who I am not.

    Quote Originally Posted by 7055 View Post
    Why do people refer to torque steer like it is only a FWD thing? When a RWD gets squirrely trying accelerate in a straight line is that not considered torque steer?

  7. #7
    Chief Procrastinator glhs0426's Avatar
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    Yep, Toyota seems to be the only sure bet for one with a seal.
    There is no replacement for air displacement

    John R.

  8. #8
    Need members 4 wolf pack DodgeZ's Avatar
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    I think I am going to order an OEM one.
    I'd rather be hated for who I am, rather than loved for who I am not.

    Quote Originally Posted by 7055 View Post
    Why do people refer to torque steer like it is only a FWD thing? When a RWD gets squirrely trying accelerate in a straight line is that not considered torque steer?

  9. #9
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    When ya think about it, it's dumb to put a breather in a valve cover. There's oil trying to drain back down to the pan while gasses from blow by are trying to get to the breather. Presumably, at high engine speeds the valve cover is filling up with oil AND a bunch of hot gas is blowing by and trying to get up there to the PCV escape valve too.

    Obviously, the breather/pcv valve gets put on the valve cover because that is usually the highest point of the engine and it is hoped that gravity will help keep oil from being pumped out the PCV valve with the gasses of blow by.

    I do not know if this "problem" of oil filling the valve cover actually happens, or if it is really a problem.

    If you could control windage, then you might be able to evacuate your blow by from the crank case instead of from the valve cover and then the valve cover might drain a little bit better.

    The pics are of reed valves that are used as breathers on Kawasaki motorcycles. They too evacuate from the top end but those engines have great big cam chain cavities for crankcase blowby air to move through - and - they're not boosted.

    With proper windage/baffling, these reed valves, mounted on the side of the pan, or high on the block, maybe at the old mechanical fuel pump area, might do a better job than a low flow ball type PCV check valve.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #10
    The Junkyard Master Force Fed Mopar's Avatar
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    Many imports and some domestics are evacuated from the crankcase, they have a sort of trap/filter deal that prevents the PCV from sucking up oil. Hondas are a good example, should be able to google Honda PCV systems and see what I'm talking about.


    Rob M.

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